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Ideas rule the world

A very clever phrase, if you ask me. Following the definition of Wikipedia; “An idea is a concept or abstraction formed and existing in the mind. The human capacity to contemplate ideas is associated with the capacity for reasoning, self-reflection and the capacity to acquire and apply the intellect. In addition, ideas give rise to real concepts , or generalizations of the mind, which are the basis of any kind of knowledge, be it scientific or philosophical. “

So why do we say they rule the world? “Everything you see and touch was once an invisible idea until someone decided to make it come true.” – Richard Bach. Like a dream, an idea springs up in the mind, flies in our brain until it is used or naturally fades. The uniqueness and power that distinguish any successful company or individual starts with the kinds of ideas that come to mind (usually influenced by their state of mind, environment, and situations).

Having an idea is not enough, but it is a good start. To start a business, you need to come up with an idea. Then once you’re in business, you’ll need more ideas for design, engineering, capacity building, marketing, creative problem solving, customer retention, and more. Day after day, you would need to think and come up with new creative ideas to sustain existing ideas. The accelerated pace of change and the current ease of new entrants into new markets due to technological advancements leave no time to be neglected when it comes to encouraging and nurturing ideas. The success or failure of a business could depend on a single idea or the moment.

Most companies are not lacking in new ideas, but they are lacking in ways to evaluate, prioritize, and execute on those new ideas. For example, IBM existed when Dell took advantage of the Internet and began selling computers online. Dell Computers had an “idea” that IBM lacked, and by developing that unique idea at the time, Dell made MONEY and a strong brand. Ideas not only take you out of your shell, they have the power to creatively stand out.

Find great ideas? Basically, ideas are born from the combination of existing ideas to form an invention (for example, “car” and “kitchen” = “mobile restaurant”). Companies should welcome new ideas and suggestions with enthusiasm. If an idea is given due attention, it can become the hero of the city, the next big marketing campaign, or even the perfect incubator for your next innovative product or service.

There are several cases in history in which great ideas were born and have been successful:

Finding solutions to a need spawned the Crayola brand crayons, which started out as a need for a kid-friendly school instrument. To enhance his Garment Care business (another laundry or better yet a “glorified launderer”), he embraced Alder’s “brand” concept and success, we can say. The famous Mark and Spencer wanted to differentiate themselves from other UK retail stores; today, miles away, the igbo * -boy in the Tejuosho * market, sells with lines like “this is original material, like Mark and Spencer”. Post It Notes was created from the “failures” of a series of experiments trying to create a heavy adhesive. Adjusting to change has helped Madonna (the world-renowned singer and businesswoman) maintain a firm grip on her legion of fans. Despite all the criticism surrounding her career, by incorporating the latest in dance, music and trends into her own style, she has managed to preserve her stage space in the entertainment industry for decades. I remember that banking in Nigeria was also very boring before Bond Bank (then) * and GTBank * changed the game thanks to Alder’s consulting. The lists go on and on.

To build a strong brand from companies or individuals, you must have a unique story to tell. The Einsteins, Gates, Dangotes *, Bruces *, Models *, all had achieved it because, Ideas rule the world!

(* Note: this article was written from the Nigerian perspective and languages).

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