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Expressions of excuse and apology in Filipino

In continuation of the Filipino expressions, I have here a handful of apologies and the like. Let’s start by making excuses first. Our first entry is very similar to the Japanese shitsurei shimasu. I already introduced this in the basic expression in a Philippine post I have a few weeks ago. Sayo is short for sa iyo which means for you (singular). Sa inyo is the plural of to you. Kanila means their goal when sa is added (sa kanila), it means for them. The whole expression, as you can see, has na. This is added so that the expressions sound natural. Add ho to make the sentence a bit polite and po to make it more polite. We can’t use both in one award. The speaker generally chooses one depending on the amount of respect he wants to implement. The following can mean that I can be rude to you in different ways and willing to the degree of courtesy. The last expression is the most polite and the first is the basic one.

mawalang galang na

Mawalang galang na sayo

Mawalang galang na sa inyo

Mawalang galang na ho

Mawalang galang na ho sa inyo

Mawalang galang na ho sa kanila

Mawalang galang na po

Mawalang galang na po sa inyo

Mawalang galang na po sa kanila

The next one we have means a little differently. Notice maabala here. This is derived from abala which means disturbance. Lang is actually similar to Japanese chotto, but the Philippine counterpart has another function. Kita was explained in the post titled Filipino Wikang. It is a pronoun that is different from English. Both the word you and I consist of one word. A Filipino would never use ko ka or ko ikaw in any sentence in any situation. Instead, kita is used. Kayo means you (plural). Sila means they or them (here, it means them as if it could bother them). However, it is also used to refer to a second person singular or plural pronoun (very polite).

maabala lang kita

Maabala ko lang kayo

Maabala ko lang ho kayo

Maabala ko lang ho sila

Maabala ko lang po kayo

Maabala ko lang po sila

Next, we can see the word buttorbo. Note that the root of the word here is istorbo, which means disturbance. It can be of Spanish or English origin. The sure thing here is that it is an alternative to abala that we discussed earlier.

maistorbo lang kita

maistorbo ko lang kayo

Maistorbo ko lang ho kayo

Maistorbo ko lang ho sila

Maistorbo ko lang po kayo

Maistorbo ko lang po sila

After the elaboration done with the expressions of apology, we will now turn to the expressions of apology. Note that I am preparing here two groups of apology and the first has two forms or styles and the other has three. The basic one is paumanhin and patawad and the rest are the variations depending on who the speaker is talking to (age and number are considered here). Another thing is the use of the English word Sorry. It is very common to use this and in fact this is more prepared especially in urban areas. Many people would comment that someone who still uses the apologetic Tagalog expressions is old-fashioned or overly patriotic, but others may think it’s romantic and nice to listen to (depending on the values ​​of the people involved). If you remember, it is attached to ask for confirmation in a loving affair.

Paumanhin

paumanhin po

Paumanhin-ho

Paumanhin, huh?

Note that the list below has the ipag prefix and we can find it in the other group of apology expressions. This prefix is ​​also used to make a request and also sounds sweet or passionate to any listener. This can mean if I can be forgiven.

Ipagpaumanhin mo

Ipagpaumanhin mo na

Ipagpaumanhin mo na ako

Ipagpaumanhin ninyo

Ipagpaumanhin na ninyo

Ipagpaumanhin na ninyo ako

Ipagpaumanhin ho ninyo

Ipagpaumanhin na ho ninyo

Ipagpaumanhin na ho ninyo ako

Ipagpaumanhin po ninyo

Ipagpaumanhin na po ninyo

Ipagpaumanhin na po ninyo ako

Patawad is derived from tawad, which means to haggle, but in this case it is used to apologize.

patawad

Patawadpo

patawad ho

Patawad, huh?

Ipagpatawad month

Ipagpatawad mo na

Ipagpatawad ninyo

Ipagpatawad na ninyo

Ipagpatawad ho ninyo

Ipagpatawad na ho ninyo

Ipagpatawad po ninyo

Ipagpatawad na po ninyo

As for the third style, notice that there is a slight difference in spelling. Instead of patawadin, the letter d in the root of the word changed to r. it is common among Filipinos to have this change from the /d/ sound to the /r/ sound. For now, let’s focus on expressions and leave phonology for future reference. You may wonder why ipagpaumanhin’s list doesn’t include apologizing for others (the samples only have the first person). I even wonder if it is possible to use the above discussed expression to apologize to another person (using ipagpaumanhin). I don’t remember anyone here in the Philippines saying ipagpaumanhin mo na siya and the like. Another thing that surprises me is the use of ipagpatawad mo na ako and the like (never heard anyone use this) so I didn’t include it here.

Forgive me expressions.

Patwarin mo ako

Patawarin mo na ako

Patawarin ninyo ako

Patawarin na ninyo ako

Patawarin ninyo ho ako

Patawarin na ninyo ho ako

Patawarin ninyo po ako

Patawarin na ninyo po ako

Expressions to forgive us.

patwarin mo kami

Patawarin mo na kami

Patawarin ninyo kami

Patawarin na ninyo kami

Patawarin ho ninyo kami

Patawarin na ho ninyo kami

Patawarin po ninyo kami

Patawarin na po ninyo kami

Expressions to forgive him.

Patawarin mo siya

Patawarin mo na siya

Patawarin ninyo siya

Patawarin na ninyo siya

Patawarin ho ninyo siya

Patawarin na ho ninyo siya

Patawarin po ninyo siya

Patawarin na po ninyo siya

Expressions to forgive them.

patwarin mo sila

Patawarin mo na sila

Patawarin ninyo sila

Patawarin na ninyo sila

Patawarin ho ninyo sila

Patawarin na ho ninyo sila

Patawarin po ninyo sila

Patawarin na po ninyo sila

Ako means I or I (here, it means I as in forgive me). Ninyo is the plural you and mo is the singular. Ninyo can be singular to denote politeness. Kami means we or us (here, it means us as forgive us). Siya means he/she or him/her (here, it means he or she as in forgive him). In Filipino, gender is not specified except for Spanish loan words. Sila means they or them (here means they as in forgive them)

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